How to Avoid a Shark Attack

Close your eyes and picture yourself on a tropical beach snorkeling in the cool, clear blue ocean. Colorful fish dart before your eyes and you sense other creatures nearby. A shadowy fin. Those terrifying black eyes. A little shark approaches…and gets bigger as it gets close. What do you do? Panic? Punch it in the nose? Or prepare ahead of time to avoid this chilling interaction?

There are a number of things you can do to make sure you stay safe from sharks in the wide-open ocean. With today’s shark deterrent technology and research, there are quite a few options when it comes to avoiding these sharp-toothed creatures. You want to wear the right things and act the right way to avoid a shark attack.

What NOT to Wear

You’ll be relieved to know that there has already been research done on what colors attract sharks, so you can avoid wearing the wrong thing when swimming in the ocean. Think about what sharks eat—brightly colored fish.

According to the International Shark Attack File, a joint venture between the American Elasmobranch Society and the Florida Museum of Natural History, sharks are attracted to bright yellows, oranges, and greens. Yes, the color that most companies choose for kayaks and “safety” gear. They recommend that you look for matte colors or blues to be closer to the color of the water versus standing out in bright colors. Since this research was conducted and released, there are multiple professional surfers that have traded in their sunshiny yellow surfboards for more subtly colored boards.

Be sure to leave all your shiny jewelry at home as well. Sharks can be attracted to sparkles from a distance. Wear dark, blue, or matte colors and obviously don’t get in the ocean if you have any open wounds that could attract a shark.

How NOT to Act in Water

You already know not to go in the water if it’s murky or if visibility is poor, but you should also know that how you act can send the wrong messages at the wrong time to curious sharks.

  • STAY CALM: When swimming in the ocean, it’s advised not to make large splashes, which could invite a nosy shark to come see what’s going on. Use smooth strokes when swimming and act calmly to avoid a shark attack. People talk about sharks having a sixth sense – which is partially true. The sensory nodes on the front of their noses called the ampullae of Lorenzini can sense small electrical disturbances like your pounding heart that can come from fear or excitement. So, if you’re looking for a shark deterrent in your control – it’s staying calm.
  • SEE YOUR SURROUNDINGS: Be aware of what’s around you. Are there schools of fish going ballistic or are there some seabirds that are freaking out above the water? It’s extremely important to notice your surrounding environment which can offer many clues about what’s nearby. If you sense or see a dangerous predator or shark, get out of the water immediately.
  • STAY OUT AFTER SIGHTINGS: Probably our most obvious tip, but if there have been shark sightings in the area, make sure you stay out of the water until officials declare the area safe for swimming. Certain areas have “shark seasons” so be sure to research when those are before a vacation to the ocean.

What TO Wear

There are a lot of innovative products on the market that say they work to keep you safe from sharks when you’re swimming or relaxing in open water. These heavily discussed accessories are known as “shark deterrent devices” rang from a spray inspired by putrefied shark flesh to mostly ineffective magnet bracelets, many of the shark deterrent options on the market aren’t exactly well-tested or effective.

SHARK DETERRENT: Electronic shark deterrent devices are one of the only tested and proven ways to repel sharks when swimming in the ocean. One of the most trusted brands is the E-Shark Force shark deterrent bracelet. The establisher of E-Shark Force spent more than 12 years innovating the E-Shark Force shark deterrent, one of the most ground-breaking electronic shark deterrent bands.

How does the E-Shark Force electronic shark deterrent device work? When the unit (either a shark deterrent surf leash or band) gets into the saltwater, it turns on automatically. When the unit is on, it releases an electrical current which prevents sharks from performing the “bump and bite” action that they tend to do. When in the water and wearing the E-Shark Force shark deterrent bracelet, many people have noticed a decrease in shark activity around them and have found that the peace of mind is priceless. After using the shark deterrent device and rinsing in fresh water, it’s easily rechargeable. The electrical current doesn’t do any damage to sea life – just keeps sharks at a safe distance. E-Shark Force is widely becoming known as the best shark deterrent device on the market and is already keeping people safe from sharks in the ocean.

What if You Get Attacked?

It’s common sense that if you see a shark, you should get out of the water as soon as possible. If you can, try to keep eye contact with the shark while you head to land to keep the shark from getting aggressive. If you get to the point where there is an aggressive shark within arm’s reach, use that arm and pop the shark on the nose—right in the ampullae. These sensitive organs probably smart when smacked by a human hand, so remember this trick to send a shark swimming if it gets up close and personal. If by chance, the shark already has a hold of you, poke the eyes, claw at its gills, do whatever it takes to get that jaw free so you can get to safety.

Nobody ever wants to be the victim of a shark attack, but it does happen. Prepare ahead of time to take all the precautions you can to be safe when swimming in the open ocean. Wear dark/matte non-bright colors. Don’t move erratically. Wear a shark deterrent device. Head to land if you see a shark and punch it in the nose if it gets too close. Overall, be safe, have fun in the ocean and don’t let fear keep you from enjoying a sunny beautiful day on the beach and in the cool, clear ocean water.

By Matt King how to 0 Comments

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